evaluation of the use of agricultural residues as an energy feedstock
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Published by Dept. of Energy, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in [Washington], Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Agricultural wastes.,
  • Power resources.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby John A. Alich, Jr. ... [et al.].
ContributionsAlich, John A., United States. Dept. of Energy.
The Physical Object
Paginationv. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17647755M

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An evaluation of the production of agricultural residues in Turkey and their conversion to electrical energy via gasification was realized. Agricultural residues were classified into two main. Agricultural Residues and. Biomass Energy Crops. There are many opportunities to lever-age agricultural resources on existing lands without interfering with pro-duction of food, feed, fiber, or forest products. In the recently developed advanced biomass feedstock com-mercialization vision, estimates of potentially available biomass supply. The utilisation of agricultural solid biomass as feedstock for energy production is continuously growing all over Europe. is evaluation of potential use of agricultural biomass fly ash for the. fuel supplies and global climate change. Dedicated energy crops such as corn or short rotation forestry plantations can provide feedstock for bioenergy production, but agricultural residues are typically less inexpensive because production costs are included in the cost of producing the main crop or .

Hydrothermal, dilute acid, and steam explosion pretreatment methods, were evaluated for their efficiency to improve the methane production yield of three Mediterranean agricultural lignocellulosic residues such as olive tree pruning, grapevine pruning, and almond shells. Hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreatments provided low to moderate increase in the digestibility of the biomass samples Cited by: 7.   Stanford Research Institute () An Evaluation of the Use of Agricultural Residues as an Energy Feedstock, Volume I, prepared for National Science Foundation, Washington, D. C. (research applied to national needs) Google ScholarCited by: 2.   Bioenergy is the single largest source of renewable energy in the European Union (EU); of this, 14% was produced from agricultural feedstocks in This chapter provides an overview of the current use (for bioenergy) and future potential of agricultural feedstocks for (amongst others) biorefinery purposes in the European by: 3. Research Article Evaluation of Mediterranean Agricultural Residues as a Potential Feedstock for the Production of Biogas via Anaerobic Fermentation ChristosNitsos, 1,2 LeonidasMatsakas, 2 KostasTriantafyllidis, 1,3 scope, agricultural residues from olive tree pruning, grape-.

  “ An Evaluation of the Use of Agricultural Residues as an Energy Feedstock,” Volume I, prepared for National Science Foundation, Washington D. C. (research applied to national needs), [31] Steffgen, F. W. “ Energy from Agricultural Products,” paper presented to American Society of Agronomy, Las Vegas, Nevada, The development of advanced standardized biomass fuels should focus on ensuring an enlarged raw material portfolio for bioenergy inside Europe, with a particular focus on the use of agricultural and forestry residues as well as biodegradable waste and residue streams result from harvesting practices (agriculture, forestry, landscape), feedstock Cited by: 2. Evaluation of Mediterranean Agricultural Residues as a Potential Feedstock for the Production of Biogas via Anaerobic Fermentation. Nitsos C(1), Matsakas L(2), Cited by: 7. INTRODUCTION. In the world today, the leading sources of energy are fossil fuels, which include mainly coal,oil and natural gas. The ever growing demand of heat and power for cooking, district heating and other heating processes, construction, manufacturing, communications, transportation, lighting and other utility needs, has led to the great reduction of the energy sources and the Cited by: 4.